I’m enjoying the recent feeds for the #AmeliaConcours hashtag on Twitter so much, I thought I’d add it here on Amelia Island Net. Great images of staging for the show, if you scroll through the feed.  

Parody, Periods and Politics

Reading through a local blog by a locally famous writer, it didn’t occur to me to see the writing as offensive or directed toward anyone in a particularly inappropriate way.   Dave Scott writes in an aggressive style I probably couldn’t pull off, but usually leaves me laughing by the end of his post/rant/editorial. Today’s post began with his opinions on local politics and issues, but ended with a pretty humorous joke about a cannon, adoption agency and a child. No one should take offense and most of his writing covers local interest, with an overly honest opinion from Dave.   Does it trample roughshod over ego?  Sure, but the point of his blog is to express his unfiltered opinions.   I don’t always agree, but he does seem to find the key polarizing issue and problem.  Dave Scott Blog

I would recommend a quick look and reading through more than the parts of each post you might find offensive. If you find yourself leaving with hurt feelings, you might want to reconsider how sanitized your news might be in the rest of your day.  News and editorials aren’t supposed to agree with every opinion you might have. We need grumpy, annoyed, unfiltered writing and reporting.  In my opinion, the more a writer stirs up discussion and the more you find yourself thinking, the better.  Dave, I like to think of as a friend.  He thinks a great deal about local issues and, while he sometimes chooses a less politically correct way to cover the story, he creates discussion by finding the heart of the  issue.   Is the airport terminal a success or example of waste?  Why isn’t the marina running and operating, after 2 years?  Is the commission doing a good job?  Does Dave like the commissioners?  Do we like the commissioners?  Should local politicians weigh in on national issues beyond the scope of local office?   I don’t find anything he writes offensive, but then think about the absurdity of finding offense with anything you choose to read.

Thinking of absurdity, I manage a local’s group with a focus on promoting “ON ISLAND” business.  The rules, yes rules, center around being positive, using real identities and encouraging discussions to reflect the opinions of real locals.  Amazing at times, after asking members to read rules and even indicating that agreement in writing, I’m deleting a member every few days for repeatedly ignoring the rules.   Regardless, the insisting on civility and using a real identity is, in my opinion, doing more to keep the space productive.   I don’t much like the term “safe space”, but “civil space” and discussions make it a great place to talk.  🏝 Amelia Island Local Net  I know, the name is  an intentional mirror of this website.  In using social media, I wanted to have a way to publish from a blog, but also create a positive forum for locals.

This is, apparently, my week to learn about my frequent typing errors and “obvious to anyone” signs I’m older than 40. Do you use two spaces after a “period” or punctuation at end of sentence? I’m so accustomed to the double space, it never occurred to me to question. Letters, once about as common as an email for me, are now once a year and the spacing I use in typing is left over from time with a manual typewriter in the 70’s. I’ll break the habit in a few weeks, but that extra space and knowing it dates every online communication, is reason enough to erase the habit.

But one rule from typing class has definitely expired, and if you’re over 40, it’s possible that no one has given you the message. Here it is:

Unless you are typing on an actual typewriter, you no longer have to put two spaces after a period.  Cult of Pedagogy 3/9/18


Weather and Changes to Concours d’Elegance 2018

Please verify all changes on the event facebook page or on the event website.  The below changes are based on weather forecast for Sunday.

The Amelia Island Concours d’Elegance moves to Saturday March 10 due to weather

RM Sotheby’s Amelia Island moves to Friday March 9

Even in the best case scenario, the forecast for Sunday’s scheduled Amelia Island Concours d’Elegance includes rain and lots of it. With a strong chance of heavy precipitation forecast for Sunday and a sunshine-filled Saturday in the mix, The Amelia Concours team has moved Sunday’s award-winning Concours to Saturday. The Concours show will now coincide with Saturday’s Cars & Coffee at the Concours presented by Heacock Classic Insurance.

The new schedule is as follows:

Saturday, March 10, Cars & Coffee at the Concours 9am until 5pm
Saturday, March 10, Amelia Island Concours d’Elegance 9:30am until 5pm

Other important changes include moving Saturday’s Drivers of the IMSA Prototypes Seminar to Sunday at 10:30am in the Talbot Ballroom, The Ritz-Carlton, Amelia Island

Saturday evening’s Gala is unchanged.

RM Sotheby’s Auction will move to Friday March 9 at 3pm.

Not many left? 1800’+/- Florida Waterfront Acreage & Very Uncommon Frontage….

Acreage and exceptional views at the end of Glenwood Road is more accessible than you might think.  Only minutes away from the 2018 Concours d’Elegance, you can actually buy 22 acres on the water for less than the price of a used car.   $2.75 million Make that a really nice used car! Based on a rough approximation,  1800 feet of the property fronts on two named waterways.  The cottage for a caretaker is currently occupied and, while modest, might create a tax advantage with existing rental onsite.  Last year, according to Bloomberg’s coverage of the event, one car….the “1957 Jaguar XKSS Roadster, is expected to bring $16 million with Gooding & Co.”. www.bloomberg.com 3/7/18. Comparing some of the prices for these, admittedly, exceptional cars, I still love waterfront and, in this case, a very unusual “Glenwood Point”.

Glenwood Point with Fernandina visible a short boat ride away. 

Just consider some of the changes to Amelia Island and the vicinity. Frankly, I’m surprised anything like this still exists in so close to downtown Fernandina on Amelia Island.  Interested in buying?  Give me a call over the weekend and I’ll have a contract ready for you to review by the end of the day.   The majority of my contracts are electronic.   This particular owner will consider financing with a large deposit, may take a larger condo or ocean-front property as a portion of the price or, I’m always happy to presenting offers or look for creative solutions.

Amelia Concours d’Elegance

IMG 1307A local favorite event, the greatest part of the show, in my opinion, is the exceptional support for local charities.   In looking over the website for this year’s show, it took me a few minutes to locate information on donation to the foundation or a summary of the supported charities.  

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Please enjoy the show, take home a few memories of the island and consider the underlying accomplishment.    

Charity – Amelia Concours d’Elegance:

Now in its second decade, the Amelia Island Concours d’Elegance is among the top automotive events in the world. Always held the second full weekend in March “The Amelia” draws nearly 250 rare vehicles from collections from around the world to The Golf Club of Amelia Island and The Ritz-Carlton, Amelia Island for a celebration of the automobile like no other. Since 1996 the show’s Foundation has donated over $2.5 million to Community Hospice & Palliative Care and other deserving charities from Florida’s First Coast.

Flood Zones and Twitter Reminder from Nassau County Emergency Services

Do you need flood insurance?  Worth remembering, we’ve flooded twice in the 1% 100 year flood areas.  See below for more information,  but think before removing flood insurance from your budget.   

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According to Nassau County Emergency Management, “Even if you live in an area with only a 1% chance annually of flooding, you should have #NFIP Flood Insurance! In the past 18 months, we’ve seen severe flooding TWICE in those “just 1% chance per year” areas.” https://t.co/8gPCptBeK9

— NassauEM (@NassauEM) February 28, 2018


Flood Zones | FEMA.gov:

Flood hazard areas identified on the Flood Insurance Rate Map are identified as a Special Flood Hazard Area (SFHA). SFHA are defined as the area that will be inundated by the flood event having a 1-percent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any given year. The 1-percent annual chance flood is also referred to as the base flood or 100-year flood. SFHAs are labeled as Zone A, Zone AO, Zone AH, Zones A1-A30, Zone AE, Zone A99, Zone AR, Zone AR/AE, Zone AR/AO, Zone AR/A1-A30, Zone AR/A, Zone V, Zone VE, and Zones V1-V30. Moderate flood hazard areas, labeled Zone B or Zone X (shaded) are also shown on the FIRM, and are the areas between the limits of the base flood and the 0.2-percent-annual-chance (or 500-year) flood. The areas of minimal flood hazard, which are the areas outside the SFHA and higher than the elevation of the 0.2-percent-annual-chance flood, are labeled Zone C or Zone X (unshaded).

Cafe Karibo Tops Local Recommendations…Kombucha, Seafood, Courtyards and more…

Cafe Karibo is one of the places I enjoy sharing with clients.   With, literally, something for everyone, I can find a healthy choice or one of the best burgers on the island.   The back courtyard is also one of the prettiest places I’ve ever seen for lunch or a quiet meal.  If you’ve ever considered creating an outdoor space, this is one of the best local examples of an outdoor fireplace and dining. Local color like the “Before I Die” board, local seafood and creative daily specials….this place just tops my list of local recommendations. tUGyIrMeRPKGoCZwEW5IPA.jpgN1sec5gGQugYhj6f716w.jpg


Today, my wife enjoyed the soup of the day and I ordered a favorite, the veggie wrap and a kombucha tea from their local supply.   As usual, I thought to take a picture with only 1/4th left, but you get the idea.  Completely full of fresh vegetables and tofu, this is a very healthy choice and more than enough for lunch.

No Longer Beaches

We’re so diverse, has anyone considered just how many people come here for reasons “Not the Beach”?

7 quick reasons to live or visit Amelia Island….

  1. The environmental areas are amazing with trees sometimes well over 100 years in age.
  2. Fishing excursions and boating make this a great place to live.  Ramps very near ocean access mean a lot.
  3. Bikes enjoy runs to the historic district, including the oldest watering hole in the state.
  4. The farmer’s market is fun on the weekend.   Live music and lots of local food.
  5. Exceptional architecture and renovations of historic buildings mean something new, even if you come here every year or live in the area.
  6. Jobs bring people.  The diverse economy is as important as tourism.
  7. Don’t forget the Cuban coffee!   I like coffee, but Hola on North 2nd is my favorite stop.

…but then, we do have really great beaches.

Age of Your Live Oak Tree

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Live oaks on Amelia Island are some of the most resilient local inhabitants.  Unlike the water oak, they tend to live longer and weather storms.   Considering the age of a tree, I’d like to estimate the age of a tree with a 72” diameter, using the formula below.   Typically, the diameter is calculated by measuring the circumference at 4 to 5 feet above the ground and using that number to calculate a diameter.   


How to Age a Live Oak Tree | Hunker:

The first 10 inches in diameter indicate an age of 76 years. Each inch after that adds six-and-a-half years up to age 154. After that, each inch adds six years.

72 Total Inches

First 10 inches  – 76 years

Then, the next 12 inches… takes us to 154 years.   After that…I’m guessing 22 inches in diameter, we still need to account for the last 50 inches at 6 years per inch.    (50×6)+154= 454 years.  That can’t be right!   Let’s compare the “Treaty Oak” age estimate in Jacksonville.  Apparently, the Treaty Oak’s estimated age is 250 years, with around 95 inches in diameter and a 25’ circumference.   If I use this number, a 72 inch oak in Fernandina might be closer to 190 years in age.  There is variation in growth rate, depending on location, water, surrounding vegetation, but seeing a tree like this as 150 to 200 years in age is reasonable.   These trees could have been saplings when Louis-Michel Aury was on the island in 1817.   

IMG 0881Regardless, big oaks are old and should be protected.  I’d love to think the big oaks I grew up with might be around for another 200 years, but the island is changing.   Looking for creative ways to develop property can preserve trees and homeowners are beginning to see the value of this preservation.    Depending on the configuration of a site, sometimes losing lots can be offset by the premium for larger lots and reduced cost for infrastructure.